Trees can't talk. But we hear them. Do you?

 

I would like to join the Forest of Donors who help Trees in Need.

My one-off donation will be:

 
5 €
10 €
20 €
other amount:  €
Invalid amount
Terms and conditions (English only)
 

If you have any queries about donating to the European Tree of the Year then please email us to support@treeoftheyear.org

1. Can I ensure my money goes to a specific tree?

No, but you can be assured that your gift to the European Tree of the Year will help to take better care of trees and landscapes in European neighbourhoods. With your support, we can empower local communities and organizations to care for trees all over Europe.

2. How much should I give?

The amount is up to you. You can decide to donate 5, 10, 20, 50 EUR or more. For 25.000 EUR a year, we can organise a contest which empowers organisations in 13+ European countries to run a national campaign on tree care and tree protection. Over the course of 50 years, a single tree can generate 28.250 EUR worth of oxygen, provide 56.000 EUR worth of air pollution control, recycle 33.500 EUR worth of water, and control 38.500 EUR worth of soil erosion. The investment to take better care of trees pays back.

3. Is making a credit card donation online secure?

Making an online donation on our website www.treeoftheyear.org is completely safe. When you make a donation, your web browser connects to a specially set-up secure server. Any personal information you enter onto our online donation pages is 'encrypted' before being sent to our card payment processor, SecurionPay. SecurionPay stores your information in a carefully controlled environment using industry standard practices. The Environmental Partnership Association is fully committed to protecting the security of your data and neither our staff nor volunteers have access to your card details.

4. Privacy policy

Environmental Partnership Association (EPA) – the organiser of the European Tree of the Year – collects personally identifiable information, such as your email address and name. This information is collected when you fill out a special form on the “thank you page”. If you leave us some information about yourself, we can send you our European Tree of the Year newsletters. We may also contact you via surveys to conduct research about your opinion. We strictly do not share this information with third parties. The Environmental Partnership Association is fully committed to protecting the security of your data and neither our staff nor volunteers have access to your card details.

In Brussels, March 12th, 2018

Miroslav Kundrata,
Environmental Partnership Association Executive

Join our Forest of Donors

 

Have a look at who has supported the virtual trees in the Forest of Donors

Forest of Donors

 

Your gift will help Trees in Need by…

 
 
protecting precious, legacy trees for future generations
 
 
providing special care to trees in need
 
 
planting thousands of trees through community initiatives across Europe
 
 
advocating for trees with members of the European Parliament, European Commissioners, national politicians and policymakers across Europe
 

Together we can make a big impact

 

Every year more than 500 thousand European tree-lovers vote in the national and European levels of the contest.

Since the European Tree of the Year began in 2002, a staggering 2+ million have participated!

Imagine the difference we can make if everyone gave just a little to help our Trees in Need.

Rob McBride: Joint Founder & Director of TREEspect CIC

Meet Rob McBride, Tree Hunter and Trees in Need ambassador

 

Rob is a well-known, passionate campaigner for the protection of trees. For years, he has raised awareness for Trees in Need around Europe. When Rob unites tree-lovers, there are no language barriers or borders. Only the trees surrounded by people who care.

As our Trees in Need ambassador, Rob draws attention to specific trees that need help across Europe, communicates their plight, and generates community actions to protect and save these trees in need.

Rob lives and breathes trees.

Matt Baker, BBC Countryfile